E. H. Bunbury's A History of Ancient Geography Among the Greeks and Romans PDF

By E. H. Bunbury

A heritage of historic Geography one of the Greeks and Romans, From the Earliest a while until eventually the autumn of the Roman Empire - Vol. II by means of E. H. Bunbury.
This booklet is a duplicate of the unique e-book released in 1879 and should have a few imperfections similar to marks or hand-written notes.

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Extra resources for A History of Ancient Geography Among the Greeks and Romans from the Earliest Ages till the Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2

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I mn here only state very briefly the reasons which appear to me d ecisive in favour of this latter hypothOHis. t. e agreed on all handa that the q u estion must be decided by the authority of Polybius alone : neither Livy n or any later writer having any clear understanding of the s ubject. Now it is certain that Polybiua does not intimate that there wu in his day any doubt about the matter: he deaoribes the march in consider­ able detail, and notices the special natural features and obataoles which had any marked infiuence on its incidents, evidently &881lming that tbeee were we ll known.

2. Polybius himself had indeed enjoyed peculiar advantages 1 Polyb. iiL 59. l 8110T. 2. 17 POLYBIUS. in this respect from the circuniStances of his life and political career. o. 204, he was th e son of Lycortas, one of the most distinguished leaders of the Achiean League, and was early initiated in political and military atrairs. o. 167) he was one of the Acbreans selected as men of rank and influence tC? be sent as hostages to Rome, where he remained seventeen years ; and during this period be had not only the opportunity of studying the political institutions and history of Rome, which were still very im­ perfectly known to the Greeks in general, but he contracted close personal friendships with many of the leading Roman statesmen ; among others with the younger Scipio Africanus, whom at a later period he accompanied during the Third Punie War.

P. 90. 14 BISTOBY or ANCIBNT GEOGRAPHY. interval is more than 51° of longitude or CluP. XVD. about 240 G. miles, (2400 stadia), ao that the estimate of Eratosthenes was in reality conaiderably 'below the truth. Throughout the long discussion which Strabo has preserved to us, of the geography of these regions, and the points connecting them with Alex­ andria, it would appear that Hipparchus was generally wrong, while the views of Eratosthenes were approximately correct. It is difficult, however, to pronounce judgement with con­ fidence in auch a controversy without being able to conauU and compare the original authorities.

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A History of Ancient Geography Among the Greeks and Romans from the Earliest Ages till the Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by E. H. Bunbury


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